Water Security is National Security

Water resources and how they are managed impact almost all aspects of society and the economy, in particular health, food production and security, domestic water supply and sanitation, energy, industry, and the functioning of ecosystems. Under present climate variability, water stress is already high, particularly in many developing countries, and climate change adds even more urgency for action. Without improved water resources management, the progress towards poverty reduction targets, the Millennium Development Goals, and sustainable development in all its economic, social and environ- mental dimensions, will be jeopardized. UN Water.Org

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Ait Baamrane tribal region of southwest Morocco harvests Water from air

These Moroccans are turning foggy days into a solution to their water crisis

Dar Si Hmad opened a water school, where young boys and girls learn about the fundamentals of water management, irrigation and sustainability.

And community members say they're happy to now have the opportunity to send their kids to school instead of sending them to get water.

“My kids think about nothing but their studies,” says Nsoda Bokhilfa. “They don’t have to think about getting water.” Read More

Friday, February 9, 2018

Pakistan's Water Crisis Is a Ticking Time Bomb


Only a few other countries, most of them war-torn places like Syria and Gaza, have experienced similar reversals in providing clean water to cities. And while the causes of Pakistan’s water crisis are complex, the country’s political instability has played a key part. Pakistan is urbanizing at a rapid rate of over 3 percent annually—the highest rate in South Asia. The causes of this fast-moving urbanization are deeply troubling, with climate change and the fight against Muslim extremists acting as key drivers. Given this ever-quickening tide, Pakistan’s cities have had trouble providing basic services, including housing and water, to new urban residents.

But the problem is worse in the water sector because rampant corruption and mismanagement keeps prices high and coverage rates low. Because Pakistan’s cities can’t keep up with growing water demand from new residents, many urban-dwellers are forced to buy water from private tanker trucks. Read More

Saturday, February 3, 2018

YOUNG WATER LEADERS CONFERENCE BERLIN: NOV 7, 2018


Welcome to the Young Water Leaders Berlin Event which connects current leaders with future leaders to ensure a water-secure world for today’s and future generations.

Young Water ​Leaders was ​launched in ​September 2017 ​to connect ​current leaders ​with future ​leaders. ​

Young Water ​Leaders Berlin ​is the first ​major event to ​bring current ​and future ​leaders ​together to ​build a water-​secure world.​ ​

~Robert ​Brears, Author ​of Urban Water ​Security (Wiley)​, Founder of ​Mitidaption, ​Mark and Focus, ​and Young Water ​Leaders . Read More

Thursday, December 28, 2017

A Landmark California Plan Puts Floodplains Back in Business


A Landmark California Plan Puts Floodplains Back in Business — Water Deeply

SOMETHING MONUMENTAL HAPPENED on August 25 in California water management that received almost no media attention: It became official policy to reconnect the state’s major rivers with their floodplains.

The action by the Central Valley Flood Protection Board, an obscure panel appointed by the governor, clears the way for the state to embrace projects that allow floods to recharge groundwater. This could include projects like breaching levees, building setback levees and creating flood bypass structures so rivers can inundate historic floodplains for the first time in a century.

In short, it means rivers must no longer be confined within levees as a standard practice.

The result could be not only reduced flood risk, but reviving severely depleted groundwater aquifers, restoring wildlife habitat and improving the capabilities of existing water storage reservoirs.

The state calls these “multibenefit” flood-control projects, said Mike Mierzwa, chief of the office of flood planning at the California Department of Water Resources. They’re a major focus of the Central Valley Flood Protection Plan, a massive policy document the board adopted at its August 25 meeting.
Read More

Friday, December 8, 2017

Silicon Valley Wants to Solve Our Water Problems


Despite a ​lack of VC ​funds, ​there’s a ​steady flow of ​entrepreneurs. ​

Gary ​Kremen—​the founder of ​Match.com, ​former owner of ​Sex.com, and ​serial ​investor—​is into water. ​

The ​entrepreneur ​started ​investing in ​water tech ​startups a few ​years ago. ​Today ​he’s an ​elected member ​of Silicon ​Valley’​s ​water district , an ​agency that ​manages water ​and flood ​control ​for 2 million ​people. ​Earlier this ​year, he helped ​craft ​a proposal to build ​a tunnel under ​the Sacramento-​San Joaquin ​River Delta ​that could ​improve ​drinking water ​reliability for ​cities from San ​Jose to San ​Diego. ​

Following ​several years ​of ​investing in ​energy and ​solar startups, ​Kremen became ​attracted to ​water problems, ​he says, ​because ​it’s an ​issue ​that’s ​yet to be ​solved. “​Water is so, so,​ so, so hard,​” he says.​ “We need ​to focus on the ​hard things.​” ​

A small ​fraction of ​venture capital ​dollars ​currently goes ​into tech to ​manage or clean ​water. Analysis ​from research ​company ​Cleantech Group ​finds that ​total dollars ​and deal volume ​for water tech ​startups in ​2016 were down ​70 percent ​and 65 percent,​ ​respectively, ​from a ​peak in ​2013. Many ​water ​investments are ​now coming from ​family offices, ​corporate ​investors, and ​philanthropy. ​

But despite ​the investing ​challenges, ​there’s ​still healthy ​interest from ​entrepreneurs, ​who are ​drawn in ​by issues such ​as California’​s drought, the ​Flint, Mich., ​water crisis, ​climate change, ​and population ​growth. ​The number of ​tech accelerators ​focused on ​water issues ​jumped from 14 ​in 2013 to 26 ​in the first ​half of 2017, ​according to ​Cleantech Group.​

At the same ​time, water-​intensive ​industries ​looking to ​conserve ​resources ​and comply with ​regulations are ​increasingly ​turning to ​software to do ​so.

Robin ​Gilthorpe, ​chief executive ​officer of ​seven-year-​old ​WaterSmart Software Inc. , says he ​now sees “​a good steady ​flow of capital ​and entrepreneurs ​into the water ​sector.” ​His company, ​which was ​Kremen’s ​first ​investment, ​uses data to ​help water ​utilities ​improve their ​operations. ​

“Three ​years ago, ​‘digital ​water’ ​wasn’t a ​thing. ​Today ​there’s a ​lot of talk ​about it,”​ says ​Gilthorpe, who ​entered the ​field ​after a career ​in big data and ​analytics. ​

Silicon ​Valley even has ​its own water-​focused tech ​accelerator,​ ​ImagineH2O . The ​company began ​eight years ago ​and has worked ​with more than ​80 companies, ​including ​WaterSmart.​ ​Leveraging ​water data is ​one of the ​bigger trends ​for ImagineH20’​s companies, ​says its ​president, ​Scott Bryan. ​“​Entrepreneurs ​are applying ​what they ​learned in IT ​and biotech to ​the water space,​” he ​says. ​

Some argue ​that the ​greatest ​opportunity to ​invest in water ​is in ​industrial ​applications, ​not municipal ​water use. ​

The 50,000 or ​so U.S. water ​utilities are ​both highly ​regulated ​and ​conservative ​when it comes ​to buying and ​installing new ​technology.​ ​Gilthorpe ​of ​WaterSmart—​which does ​sell to ​utilities—​contends ​that these ​utilities are ​conservative ​with good ​reason. “​Water is so ​essential to ​life; you ​can’t ​take risks with ​it,” ​he says. ​

But even the ​market for ​managing ​industrial ​water has its ​challenges. In ​recent years, ​the oil and gas ​sectors have ​pulled back ​from buying ​tech that’​s used to ​manage ​wastewater. ​That has ​contributed to ​a drop in ​venture capital ​investment in ​water tech ​startups in ​recent years, ​say analysts ​at ​Cleantech Group.​

Some startups ​have managed to ​find buyers ​despite the ​difficulties. ​Earlier this ​year, ​Monsanto Co.-​owned Climate ​Corp. ​acquired a ​startup called ​HydroBio, which ​was using data ​to help farmers ​manage ​irrigation. ​Climate Corp. ​now offers the ​software ​to customers in ​Europe and ​plans to expand ​sales to ​farmers in the ​U.S.

“Water ​will continue ​to be a ​challenge in ​agriculture. ​Digital tools ​will help ​growers make ​more informed ​decisions,​” says ​Climate Corp. ​CEO Mike Stern. ​

Kremen has ​had more ​success than ​most with his ​water ​investments. In ​addition to ​putting one of ​the first ​checks into ​WaterSmart, he ​also backed ​Aquacue ​Inc., a leak ​detection ​company that ​was bought by ​Badger Meter ​Inc., as well ​as a water ​treatment ​startup called ​HydroNovation ​Inc., which was ​acquired by ​Taiwanese ​company ​KemFlo ​International ​Co.

Despite his ​investing wins,​ ​Kremen ​remains ​unusually ​focused on ​water policy. ​He plans to run ​for reelection ​to ​his ​district board ​seat in 2018. More

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Tackling water security: Who owns the right to groundwater?

Tariq said that to understand water security there is a need to understand water scarcity. He explained, “The global yardstick for water scarcity is that if you have 1,700 cubic metres per person, per year then you are in a very comfortable water regime.”

He added that the moment this amount reduces, you start getting into water stress situations, water shortages and water scarcity.

“Plant the water, as the best place to store water is underground”
“The surplus water available for Pakistan doesn’t last for more than 30 days.” He elaborated that for the rest of the 335 days, Pakistan is in a semi-drought or drought-like condition.

The PWP CEO said that for an arid country like Pakistan there is a need to have 40% surface water storage. However, he deplored that the country has only 7% storage to counter the problem. He added that this is also reducing due to sedimentation, which leaves a big question mark on the country’s water security. More

Monday, November 27, 2017

I'm on the Kill List. This is what it feels like to be hunted by drones

I [Malik Jalal] am in the strange position of knowing that I am on the ‘Kill List’. I know this because I have been told, and I know because I have been targeted for death over and over again. Four times missiles have been fired at me. I am extraordinarily fortunate to be alive.

Friends decline my invitations and I have taken to sleeping outside under the trees, to avoid becoming a magnet of death for my family

I don’t want to end up a “Bugsplat” – the ugly word that is used for what remains of a human being after being blown up by a Hellfire missile fired from a Predator drone. More importantly, I don’t want my family to become victims, or even to live with the droning engines overhead, knowing that at any moment they could be vaporized.

I am in England this week because I decided that if Westerners wanted to kill me without bothering to come to speak with me first, perhaps I should come to speak to them instead. I’ll tell my story so that you can judge for yourselves whether I am the kind of person you want to be murdered.

I am from Waziristan, the border area between Pakistan and Afghanistan. I am one of the leaders of the North Waziristan Peace Committee (NWPC), which is a body of local Maliks (or community leaders) that is devoted to trying to keep the peace in our region. We are sanctioned by the Pakistan government, and our main mission is to try to prevent violence between the local Taliban and the authorities.

In January 2010, I lent my vehicle to my nephew, Salimullah, to drive to Deegan for an oil change and to have one of the tires checked. Rumours had surfaced that drones were targeting particular vehicles, and tracking particular phone signals. The sky was clear and there were drones circling overhead.
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